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How glassblowing helps Minnesota Vikings' Stephen Weatherly decompress

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Glassblowing became therapeutic for defensive end Stephen Weatherly even more so after (1:00)

Glassblowing became therapeutic for defensive end Stephen Weatherly, even more so after he was released by the Panthers on Feb. 19. This is the vase he worked on in Charlotte before signing Thursday with Minnesota, where glassblowing became his hobby. (1:00)

CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- “Ooooh! Oooh!’’ Stephen Weatherly yelled as he noticed a small spot smoldering on his right thigh.

The five-year veteran defensive end, who recently signed a one-year deal with the Minnesota Vikings after he was released by the Carolina Panthers, momentarily lost his concentration during a glassblowing session, allowing the hot end of the six-foot pipe he was breathing into while rolling it make contact with his pants.

His instructor, Nicolas Emeric, had been waiting for such a mishap, understanding there was less clearance between the pipe and legs because Weatherly (6-foot-5, 265 pounds) is bigger than his typical clientele.

Weatherly quickly refocused as he would on the field.

“I got burned because I wasn’t locked in," he said. “When you come into the hot shop, the fact that you have to be locked in forces you to push everything to the back burner.

“... Like where am I going to end up next? That is very much on the front of my mind. When I come in here I have to think about blowing glass."

Weatherly, who will turn 27 this month, became enamored with glassblowing a few years ago during his first stint with the Vikings. He saw it on Instagram and his roommate at the time had a co-worker who owned a studio, so he went and became hooked. That ultimately led to his interest in the Netflix show “Blown Away," which led to an appearance as a guest judge on its glassblowing competition that aired in late January.

Glassblowing always has been therapeutic for Weatherly, because when dealing with molten glass at temperatures of more than 2,000 degrees, you don’t have time to think about everyday issues. It became more therapeutic when he was cut less than a year after signing a two-year, $12.5 million deal.

“So I was able to just think for an hour and 15 minutes straight, not about anything stressful, but just about creating that beautiful piece of art," Weatherly said.

Not done with football

Glassblowing began as one of Weatherly’s many hobbies when looking for things to occupy his life after football. It’s still just a hobby.

“I have a lot of good years still left in the football world," Weatherly said.

He hoped they would be spent in Carolina, rebuilding under coach Matt Rhule. Unfortunately, he had no sacks and only three quarterback pressures in nine starts, then was placed on injured reserve in November because of a finger injury that required surgery.

His release simply was a matter of fit and needing to clear $5.9 million in salary-cap space.

“They are building for the future," Weatherly said. “I didn't do enough to show that I can be part of their scheme for the future. I mean, it's a business. Just sucks."

Weatherly wasn't out of work long, reuniting with the Vikings on Thursday.

Another 'weirdo'

Emeric recognized Weatherly when he walked into Hot Glass Alley, in an eclectic Charlotte neighborhood, as a judge on “Blown Away,’’ not an NFL player.

“He definitely fits in with the rest of the weirdos in the glass world," he joked.

Coachability in football, however, made Weatherly a good student in glassblowing.

“He soaks up every little bit of information I give him," Emeric said. “And he’s responsive. Which is great, because most people don’t want to learn and dive in so far."

Teaching Weatherly was nerve-wracking initially.

“He said nobody has ever let him do this before, because they know how much his hands are worth," Emeric said.

Weatherly’s hands constantly were close to the heat that burned his pants. As violent as those hands are in football, they easily adjusted to the gentle touch needed to roll the pipe while blowing life into the glass.

Weatherly showed the same control he uses on the piano and eight other instruments he has learned to play. A sociology major at Vanderbilt, he loves the delicate side of the art world almost as much as he does the brutality of football.

“The piece, it gets heavy," Weatherly said of the 10-pound pipe and his vase that weighed 5.9 pounds but felt like 50. “So I get to use my physicality in a sense, but also my fine-tuning, like turning it with just my fingertips."

Art becomes football

Weatherly pumped his fist into the air as if he’d just made a sack. But the exhilaration came from seeing a taffy-like glop of glass become an artistic creation.

“He has such a creative mind already," Emeric said. “Most people come in and barely have an idea of what’s their favorite color.’’

The decision on Weatherly's latest project, a vase for his girlfriend, was born 24 hours earlier after he gave her flowers. He chose his favorite colors, orange and green, to remind her of him.

As rewarding as it was to put the glass into the furnace and see it blossom, it was exhausting.

“I promise you I am in shape," Weatherly said as he gathered himself after an extended period of glassblowing.

Emeric said he understood. He also understood why blowing glass has become therapeutic to Weatherly.

“Because it’s hot and it’s very intrinsic material, you can’t let your day-to-day stresses overwhelm you, because it will show in your piece," he said. “You can see where there are imperfections because your mind goes astray."

Weatherly has had mishaps. His first piece with Emeric quickly went from a pyramid to the tip of a spear.

He had better luck with other projects such as paperweights, cups, a jellyfish and a sword that adorn his home.

“I love everything I’ve done," Weatherly said.

He loved the vase in particular because he was able to push his football thoughts aside at a fragile time. At the same time, it was a lot like football.

“All the hard work, the stuff you don’t understand and see, is definitely the Wednesday, Thursday and Friday practices," Weatherly said. “But the beautiful part at the end, that’s all Sunday under the bright lights."