Golf

/ News

  • PGA Tour

Faldo confident McIlroy will win career grand slam

ESPN staff
August 14, 2012 « Skrtel ready to agree contract extension | Chartbeat test »

Sir Nick Faldo believes there is no reason why Rory McIlroy cannot go on to become the first European ever to win the career grand slam.

McIlroy, 23, won his second major championship at Kiawah Island on Sunday - adding the US PGA Championship to the US Open title he won at Congressional in 2011.

Faldo, who won six majors (three Masters, three Open Championships) during an illustrious career, believes the Northern Irishman has every chance of completing the career grand slam - and dwarfing his own achievements.

"He's got half of them already and he's right there, anything can happen," Faldo said. "You can't predict anything but he now knows, and more importantly, the rest of the field knows, that when he is on they might be playing for second place.

"Jack [Nicklaus], Seve [Ballesteros], Tiger [Woods] and Rory are the only players to win multiple majors under 25 - that puts you in a special line, doesn't it?"

Faldo believes McIlroy has now reached a level few other players ever reach, saying the Holywood native is at the point where he should tailor his schedule and practice to ensure he peaks for the four biggest tournaments of each year.

"The most important thing is to play one major are a time. Rory now knows the most important thing in his life are the majors and he should do everything to gear his schedule and the rest of his career for the majors," Faldo noted.

As for comparing McIlroy's talents with his own, Faldo is in no doubt the youngster is more naturally gifted - noting that he had to rebuild his swing and retrain his mind to achieve his great success.

"I played a strategy game, he's a power player and he knows how to play strategy as well," Faldo said. "I think that's the smart thing. You've got to be a Houdini with the wedge and a putter, that's No. 1 no matter who you are. He's got it all.

"He has a different ability, better than the average bear, when it comes to visualisation. You watch the way he looks at things. You watch the way he lines up bunker shots. He's trying to hole them.

"Maybe it's his golfing DNA gift. I didn't get that, I taught visualisation to myself but he's got something."

© ESPN Sports Media Ltd.
Close