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Harrison considers retirement talk

ESPN staff
April 29, 2013 « Live County Championship coverage | Chartbeat test »

Audley Harrison has hinted that he will retire from boxing following his defeat to Deontay Wilder in Sheffield on Saturday, admitting that he will have to talk to his family over carrying on.

Harrison was stopped in the first round of his comeback bout against unbeaten American Wilder, falling under the weight of a crashing right hook before referee Terry O'Connor stopped the fight.

The 41-year-old will now take time to decide whether to hang up his gloves and stated that, with his wife expecting the birth of their child in May, it may be the right decision to call time on his career.

"I will go away and think about it," Harrison told Press Association Sport. "My wife is expecting our baby next week so I will go home and God willing I will celebrate that. I don't think I can continue to put myself and my family through it.

"I've always said when I go into a fight 100% ready and I get beaten by the other guy, I've come to my time. This could be the end for me.

"I've given everything to fight for a world title. I've never given up and I've pushed and pushed and pushed. I have got a lot to be proud of, but I have been found wanting on a few occasions and I have to look at myself and accept that."

Harrison's latest comeback followed a second win at Prizefighter, but defeat at the hands of Wilder has now put his future in serious doubt.

It was the Londoner's second first round loss since October 2012 when he fell to David Price in Liverpool, and Harrison is now considering a possible move into the promotional side of the sport.

"I think in the long term people will look at me more favourably because I have never given up and I have achieved a good level of success," Harrison added. "I have made a lot of noise and opened a lot of doors on the promotional side.

"I will not rue fighting for a world title but I am happy with what I've achieved. I went from being a nine-year-old in the ghetto to becoming an Olympic gold-medallist. The rest of it just wasn't to be."

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