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FSU's Janarius Robinson returns to practice, describes Panama City devastation

Florida State defensive end Janarius Robinson tried to put into words what he saw in Panama City upon returning to his home with his family after Hurricane Michael.

"It just really looked like someone dropped a nuclear bomb on us," Robinson said as he met with reporters in Tallahassee before practice on Wednesday for the first time since the storm hit.

With Florida State on a bye, Robinson and his family rode out the storm in Georgia. When they returned to Panama City on Friday, they saw complete destruction.

"It was devastating to see something that you've been growing up in all your life destroyed," Robinson said. "Ripped to shreds."

Robinson shared photos on social media showing the damage to his home, which was completely destroyed. He said the home had belonged to his grandmother before it was passed down to his mother. After spending time with his family to help in the initial recovery stages, Robinson returned to practice Tuesday at Florida State.

"This is a time for me to get my mind away, and off of the things that have happened," Robinson said. "I come out here, get my mind off it and get back to work with my brothers."

Robinson was allowed to set up an NCAA-approved GoFundMe campaign to help his family rebuild its home. In addition, Florida State announced its general fund to help staff and students during times of crisis is now focused on Hurricane Michael assistance.

Earlier this week, the Florida State football team helped load 40,000 water bottles and 12,500 cases of food onto a truck headed to storm-ravaged areas.

Hurricane Michael devastated many coastal and inland areas across Florida and Georgia, leaving millions without water and electricity.

"Having something that you always grew up in and lived in taken away from you is going to be hard," Robinson said. "Going back there and it's not there, and it's not standing still. We're going to get through it though.

"It's the memories. That house has been there forever. It's my grandma's house. Some of the stuff, memories, you can't get that stuff back. Especially the house."